John Green's tumblr

Jul 30

theonion:

Americans Demand New Form Of Media To Bridge Entertainment Gap While Looking From Laptop To Phone

theonion:

Americans Demand New Form Of Media To Bridge Entertainment Gap While Looking From Laptop To Phone

(via schmoyoho)

Anonymous said: I am really curious about product placement in television and movies and was wondering about TFIOS appearing in Orange is the new Black.

Yes, I paid OITNB to call me a sick fuck.

No, I didn’t. The show’s creator is a fan of the book and a friend of mine and I’ve met a bunch of people in the cast, which I assume is why they did it, but yeah I was delighted. It was not, however, a paid product placement.

tswgo:

katiefab:

Help my friend Maddie raise money for TSWGO! 
In August, shortly after Leakycon, I’m shaving my friend Maddie’s head. In the weeks leading to August, Maddie is raising money for This Star Won’t Go Out, an charity that helps families who have a child with cancer that was founded in the memory of our dear friend Esther.
Maddie’s wanted to shave her head for ages, and she’ll be doing it regardless of what we earn, but this is a great chance to give to an amazing organization. She’ll be donating her hair as well. I hope you guys consider giving!
I’m making little crocheted star plushies for the campaign, if you want one of those!
Click here (or the picture above) to donate.

Please help our friend Maddie achieve her goal!

tswgo:

katiefab:

Help my friend Maddie raise money for TSWGO! 

In August, shortly after Leakycon, I’m shaving my friend Maddie’s head. In the weeks leading to August, Maddie is raising money for This Star Won’t Go Out, an charity that helps families who have a child with cancer that was founded in the memory of our dear friend Esther.

Maddie’s wanted to shave her head for ages, and she’ll be doing it regardless of what we earn, but this is a great chance to give to an amazing organization. She’ll be donating her hair as well. I hope you guys consider giving!

I’m making little crocheted star plushies for the campaign, if you want one of those!

Click here (or the picture above) to donate.

Please help our friend Maddie achieve her goal!

Eight Senators Announce Bipartisan Campus Accountability and Safety Act -

It will be very interesting to follow the progress of this bill through the House and Senate. Surely even a do-nothing Congress can get this done.

browngirlintherain said: John! John! I just saw your video from a NICU in Addis Ababa. THANK YOU. I loved that you spoke about KMC. I am a doctor and a newborn receiving KMC is the single most beautiful thing I have ever seen. May I suggest you read Abraham Verghese's Cutting for Stone? It is about growing up in Ethiopia and medicine and life and beauty and I think you will love it and I would love to hear you talk about it! Love your work!

I have read Cutting for Stone!

I was very impressed with what I read about Kangaroo Mother Care after talking to Dr. Gessesse. One of the things Bill Gates said to me was that a lot of the effective strategies for improving health care in the developing world (like KMC) aren’t that expensive, and many don’t require highly trained specialists.

Obviously, we need more Dr. Gessesses in the world, but a lot of the improvement in Ethiopian child mortality and vaccination rates is due to health extension workers and the amazing volunteer Women’s Health Army. These people provide prenatal care, talk to their neighbors about issues like family planning and when to introduce solid food to keep infants growing, and how to get folic acid and iron supplements inexpensively. Health extension workers, meanwhile, have only a tenth grade education and a year of training, but they can diagnose and treat illnesses from malaria to rotavirus to TB. (You’ll meet some of these people in future videos.)

All that noted, I don’t want to make it sound like a solved problem: Even with this progress, over 6% of Ethiopian children die before the age of 5. Most of those deaths are preventable, and if you believe that all human lives have equal value, you have to acknowledge the ongoing injustice and needless suffering in poor countries like Ethiopia. But the progress is real, and I think Ethiopia is blazing an important trail for the developing world.

(The video in question.)

Jul 29

[video]

hermionejg:

(xposted from twitter because reasons)
Three years today since my dad died. Shame he never knew me as an adult (I was 19) because I’m a bloody great one. He died of a sudden, out-of-nowhere stroke while I was at VidCon and he was at home in London. He was out of it straight after but still kind of there and then he died a couple of days later. 1 in 5 strokes are fatal & annually, worldwide, approx 15 million people have a stroke. To help work towards making these statistics less depressing, read up on The Stroke Association here: http://www.stroke.org.uk

Rosianna is a bloody good adult.
Rosianna was one of the first readers of Looking for Alaska, has been a nerdfighter since the very first vlogbrothers video was uploaded, and now works as my assistant (although that job title rather underplays her importance to me and to the nerdfighter community).
Three years ago today, she became the first teenager ever to read The Fault in Our Stars. Her dad had just died, and she was stuck at Vidcon. I never imagined then that she would become such a bloody good adult, or that she’d become such a close friend and collaborator.
But I have always known Rosianna to be a person of excellent judgement, blistering intelligence, and great competence. And while I know that her dad would have so much to be proud of today, he had much to be proud of then as well.

hermionejg:

(xposted from twitter because reasons)

Three years today since my dad died. Shame he never knew me as an adult (I was 19) because I’m a bloody great one. He died of a sudden, out-of-nowhere stroke while I was at VidCon and he was at home in London. He was out of it straight after but still kind of there and then he died a couple of days later. 1 in 5 strokes are fatal & annually, worldwide, approx 15 million people have a stroke. To help work towards making these statistics less depressing, read up on The Stroke Association here: http://www.stroke.org.uk

Rosianna is a bloody good adult.

Rosianna was one of the first readers of Looking for Alaska, has been a nerdfighter since the very first vlogbrothers video was uploaded, and now works as my assistant (although that job title rather underplays her importance to me and to the nerdfighter community).

Three years ago today, she became the first teenager ever to read The Fault in Our Stars. Her dad had just died, and she was stuck at Vidcon. I never imagined then that she would become such a bloody good adult, or that she’d become such a close friend and collaborator.

But I have always known Rosianna to be a person of excellent judgement, blistering intelligence, and great competence. And while I know that her dad would have so much to be proud of today, he had much to be proud of then as well.

fuckinmiki:

The official poster of the 2015 Women’s World Cup is beautiful

CAN’T WAIT.

fuckinmiki:

The official poster of the 2015 Women’s World Cup is beautiful

CAN’T WAIT.

(via nerdfighterfc)

Jul 28

 ”Get up and fight, sucker!” Ali was yelling at Liston after Liston went down in the first round.
Was the fix in? Did Liston go down on purpose? Still one of the great unanswered questions in boxing history.

 ”Get up and fight, sucker!” Ali was yelling at Liston after Liston went down in the first round.

Was the fix in? Did Liston go down on purpose? Still one of the great unanswered questions in boxing history.

(Source: nonconcept, via thejoeball)

[video]

Jul 27

Happy Eid!

Happy Eid!

(Source: dyo-kai-byunnate)

Jul 25

First time I’ve ever been in a helicopter, 100 miles south of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

First time I’ve ever been in a helicopter, 100 miles south of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

[video]

peterchayward:

fishingboatproceeds:

Earlier today, I met with several students at Addis Ababa University to discuss the opportunities and challenges they face in their academic and professional lives. 

One of the biggest challenges we have here on the Internet is hearing marginalized and underrepresented voices, especially those across the digital divide. You can’t amplify voices online that aren’t online.

While all of the young people I talked to used the Internet and most had regular access via a tablet, smartphone, or laptop, none had blogs or tumblrs or YouTube channels, and none had social network interactions with people outside their IRL social networks. I’m sure there are English-language tumblrs from Ethiopian students (although I haven’t been able to find any today), but almost all voices—even highly educated and privileged ones—from the world’s poorest countries go completely unheard online.

(And when we do hear them, it’s usually through an intermediary: videos edited by someone else, transcripts of interviews, etc. It’s not direct participation in the conversation by, for instance, posting to tumblr or reblogging HIMYM gifs. [The students I spoke to agreed that HIMYM is the best American show they have on TV, although a couple said that watching TV was a waste of time and a distraction from studying, to which I said HAVE YOU SEEN PHINEAS AND FERB BECAUSE IT IS TOTALLY EDUCATIONAL.])

Anyway, all of this is a long preamble to say: Earlier today I met with a 20-year-old law student who helped found an organization in Ethiopia devoted to empowering women and ending gender-based violence. (I’ll include her talking about her work in a video soon.)

The organization does fundraisers so the poorest women at the university can have access to contraception, and every year they have a Blood Drive for Mothers, where many students donate blood to combat maternal death. (Post-partum hemorrhaging is a too-common cause of death among Ethiopian women.)

We often think of global charity as people from rich countries giving money to people from poor countries. But the real story is much more complicated (and much more exciting!); we just don’t hear those stories often, because organizations like the one founded by the young woman I met don’t have YouTube videos or tumblrs.

Okay, this might be a dumb question, but…why don’t they have blogs? If they have access to the internet, surely making a Tumblr is a simple process that would directly get their voice out there?

Am I missing something obvious?

An Ethiopian nerdfighter who just got a tumblr responds:

"There’s no 3G coverage (as of yet) and mobile data is so terrible that it’s barely good enough to check your email. Watching a youtube video on a smartphone is unthinkable. Good internet access for your home is way too expensive to be affordable. You have a chance if you’re a university student because most of the universities here have free WiFi, but the hotspots are limited and you have to actively seek them out (which is what I do once or twice a week, to keep up with the world). And I don’t think most university students think it’s worth their time to REGULARLY seek WiFi hotspots so they can re blog stuff on tumblr."

My own experience is that even on the best university wifi networks, tumblr takes FOREVER to load (like several minutes for a single page), so there’s no way to load your dash (unless it’s all text) and posting usually fails. It’s just very different interacting with the Internet when your download and upload speeds are slower than dial up.

[video]